Ginnie Springs, Part 10: Hyla cinerea, the American Green Treefrog

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Hyla cinerea, the American green treefrog, photographed in Gilchrist county, Florida (12 April 2014).

There’s nothing quite like the densely blanketed tangles of frogs calling to one another on a softly warm, early spring night.  Such was the ambient soundtrack as the sun sank and night ascended over Ginnie Springs on 12 April 2014. With the high waters of the Santa Fe River having inundated much of the park’s lowlands, Ginnie Springs was damn-near transformed into an epic Dionysian orgy for our amphibian friends. I was, of course, all to happy to wade through the calm waters and track down frog after frog after frog — sometimes finding several together in the throes of reproduction, as was the case with the two American green treefrogs (Hyla cinerea) represented on this post. There certainly was no shortage of frogs that night.

Here are two clips recorded as a single file at Ginnie Springs at 8:22 and 8:25 pm this same evening:

What a fantastic chorus of nightsong, right? In the two clips included in this file, the dominant species you can hear is H. cinerea, the American green treefrogs. They’re the honking frogs. Behind those honks, the loud, intermittent, and amplified-cricket-like calls are from Hyla chrysoscelis, Cope’s gray treefrog (we’ll hear them more closely in our next post).

Now, what do you hear? Can you pull out any other species, amphibian or otherwise? The second section (starting around :35) is particularly intriguing — and not just because of the distant partiers you can hear elsewhere in the park. Heh. Tell me what you hear!

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Next on Dust Tracks: We’re going full-tilt Marvin Gaye mode with Cope’s gray treefrog!
Can you dig it?

APPRECIATION: Thanks to Cheri Lucas Rowlands for the Dust Tracks love today. Dust Tracks was linked in today’s “Celebrating Earth Day 2014” Hot Off the Press post. Happy Earth Day, everyone! Let’s make every day Earth Day, shall we?

~ janson

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Ginnie Springs, Part 09: Anaxyrus terrestris, the Southern Toad

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Anaxyrus terrestris, the Southern toad, photographed in Gilchrist county, Florida (12 April 2014). As night descended upon Ginnie Springs, the park’s frogs and toads perked up for a nice, long night of singing and breeding. Spring can be quite awesome when the … Continue reading

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Ginnie Springs, Part 08: Orgyia detrita, the Fir Tussock Moth

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Orgyia detrita, the Fir tussock moth, photographed in Gilchrist county, Florida (12 April 2014). Yesterday we saw a mighty fine lookin’ Forest tent caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria — a species that was damn near omnipresent throughout Ginnie Springs last weekend. Today … Continue reading

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Ginnie Springs, Part 07: Malacosoma disstria, the Forest Tent Caterpillar Moth!

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Malacosoma disstria, the Forest tent caterpillar moth, photographed in Gilchrist county, Florida (12 April 2014). Have you ever seen a silky web, perhaps between a few tree branches, packed not with spiders, but with caterpillars? If so, there’s a good … Continue reading

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Ginnie Springs, Part 06: A Rather Tiny Acrididae Grasshopper!

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Melanoplus punctulatus (likely, not confirmed), the Pine tree spur-throated grasshopper, photographed in Gilchrist county, Florida (12 April 2014). Back in Alaska, April truly was the cruelest month. With easing temperatures, we’d suffer through unfathomable snow melt punctuated by bouts of freezing … Continue reading

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Ginnie Springs, Part 05: A Rather Large Tipulidae Crane Fly

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Male cranefly, family Tipulidae (Identification Pending), photographed in Gilchrist county, Florida (12 April 2014). Another short post for today… Here we see a male crane fly of Family Tipulidae perched atop a flooded palmetto just above the waterline. At this time, … Continue reading

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Ginnie Springs, Part 04: A Really Cool Snail! [Updated 18 April 2014!]

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Likely Euglandina rosea, the Rosy wolfsnail, photographed in Gilchrist county, Florida (12 April 2014). We have a couple of short posts coming up on Dust Tracks consisting of unidentified organisms. Typically, I hold off on posting anything I haven’t managed to … Continue reading

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